Pregnancy

Umbilicated breast, can I breastfeed?


"I have breastbone tips, can I breastfeed my baby?" It worries me. "Celia Dos Santos, lactation consultant, answers Clara's question.

The answer of Celia Dos Santos, consultant in hospital and liberal lactation in Paris

  • In some women, the nipple is inside. He did not come out. There is a small hole instead of a small end. In this case it is said that the end of the breast is umbilicated or invaginated.
  • This can make it difficult to breastfeed because it is by taking the nipple that the baby can suckle. But at startup, some babies do not open wide enough to catch the nipple. He will have to grow a little to do it. And an end of breast umbilicated complicates him a little more the task. He will not suck and will get excited on the breast, at the risk of triggering pain in his mother and the fear of giving back the breast. A vicious circle that can compromise breastfeeding. Because the process of lactation is well established when the baby heads regularly and easily.
  • When the breast ends are umbilicated, the best solution is to contact a lactation consultant, if possible before giving birth. Because if the invaginated nipples are not incompatible with breastfeeding, they make it more complicated. It is better to prepare for it.
  • Breastfeeding with inverted breast tips requires a little patience and help at the beginning. The lactation consultant will present the various possible solutions. Depending on the situation, she may recommend using a breast pump to stimulate lactation and offer the baby to suck a DAL breastfeeding aid, a kind of small pipette, the time that settles well the sucking reflex.
  • It is best to always avoid a bottle whose very fast flow does not encourage and disrupts the sucking reflex in the baby and may compromise the lactation process. It is also possible to use silicone breasts. This solution allows you to simply breastfeed the time to wait until your baby opens his mouth and his sucking reflex is mature.

Interview by Frédérique Odasso

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